Thursday Glimpses 5.7.18

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Sharmishtha Basu
https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu
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Agnishatdal 2.7.18

2nd Annual digests of Agnijaat and Agnishatdal will be published on 17th July 2018. Yippee! Love you and God bless you my friends, because you made it real!

Agnijaat and Agnishatdal Book 6 were published on Tagore birthday 7th May 2018.

You can buy them from shoptly.

The links of the books:
https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu

Agnijaat And Agnishatdal Shraban will be published on 18th July. Ashar were published on 16th June.

You can buy these books by becoming my patrons in patreon:

https://www.patreon.com/sharmishthabasu

or the fresh issues from

https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu

or if these two don’t work out for you can pay me via paypal and get the pdf files directly.

When you use paypal remember one thing- SEND ME YOUR EMAIL ID AND BOOKLIST in the comment that I am almost sure paypal allows you to add with your payment, if I am wrong, even then send me your email id and booklist (with payment details) in my email : sermistabasu@gmail.com.

The books will be uploaded in shoptly and patreon every month (at the max by 25th of English calendar), you will be able to download them from both sites directly.

Authors and Artists of Agnishatdal (Agnijaat is my solo venture you all know that):

Troy David Loy
http://kestalusrealm.wordpress.com

Brieuc Martin Onraet
https://equinoxio21.wordpress.com

Dominic Collucci
http:// wrotethesequotes.blogspot.com
http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/the-tree-becomes-a-soul/15647591?productTrackingContext=author_spotlight_14739082_

Raghunandan Kuppuswamy
https://ksriranga.wordpress.com

Hemdiva Dev
https://momsprincesspari.wordpress.com

Sherri
 https://sherriofpalmsprings.wordpress.com/

Sharmishtha Basu
https://agnishatdalezine.wordpress.com

Bitter Pill and Citizen Null are pseudonyms! So… no blogs assigned to them Very secretive couple!

Saturday Korcha 30.6.18 Dakshinamurthy Pillai

Dakshinamurthy Pillai (1875 – 1936), was a leading mridangam artist who accompanied musicians in Carnatic music concerts from 1875 to 1925.

Pillai took lessons from Pudukottai Manpundia Pillai and was influenced by the music of Thanjavur Krishna Bhagavathar, Thanjavur Pakkari and Narayana Pai. He was an ardent devotee of Lord Murugan and went on to become famous as Chinmayananda Guru. His pupils include Palani Subramania Pillai, Thanjavur Ramadas, Palghat Mani Iyer, Devakottai Sunder Raj and Thangavellu Pillai of Malaya. His other important disciples are Madurai Thiruvenkatathaiyaa and Pudukkottai Dhakshinamoorthy Achariyar.

Thangavellu Pillai hailed from Trichy, India, and migrated to Malaya in 1927.

Trichy Thayumanavan, is a disciple of Dhakshinamoorthy Achariyar and is the grand disciple of Pillai. He married his guru’s daughter Kanakambujam. He built a temple for Pillai at Pudukkottai and released a book, The Life History of Dhakshinamoorthy Pillai, in 1987 at Chennai Kabaleeswara temple. He celebrates the Guru pooja of Dhakshinamoorthy Pillai every Tamil month Vaihaasi, Shasti Thithi, and Aayilya Natchthiram at Trichy.

You can check out more in Wikipedia from where the article has been copied.

Agnishatdal 25.6.18

Agnijaat And Agnishatdal Shraban will be published on 18th July. Ashar were published on 16th June.

You can buy these books by becoming my patrons in patreon:

https://www.patreon.com/sharmishthabasu

or the fresh issues from

https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu

or if these two don’t work out for you can pay me via paypal and get the pdf files directly.

When you use paypal remember one thing- SEND ME YOUR EMAIL ID AND BOOKLIST in the comment that I am almost sure paypal allows you to add with your payment, if I am wrong, even then send me your email id and booklist (with payment details) in my email : sermistabasu@gmail.com.

The books will be uploaded in shoptly and patreon every month (at the max by 25th of English calendar), you will be able to download them from both sites directly.

Agnijaat and Agnishatdal Book 6 were published on Tagore birthday 7th May 2018. You can buy them from shoptly.

The links of the books:
https://shoptly.com/sharmishthabasu

Authors and Artists of Agnishatdal (Agnijaat is my solo venture you all know that):

Troy David Loy
http://kestalusrealm.wordpress.com

Brieuc Martin Onraet
https://equinoxio21.wordpress.com

Dominic Collucci
http:// wrotethesequotes.blogspot.com
http://www.lulu.com/product/paperback/the-tree-becomes-a-soul/15647591?productTrackingContext=author_spotlight_14739082_

Raghunandan Kuppuswamy
https://ksriranga.wordpress.com

Hemdiva Dev
https://momsprincesspari.wordpress.com

Sherri
 https://sherriofpalmsprings.wordpress.com/

Sharmishtha Basu
https://agnishatdalezine.wordpress.com

Bitter Pill and Citizen Null are pseudonyms! So… no blogs assigned to them Very secretive couple!

Saturday Korcha 23.6.18 “mridangam”

This article is about the wooden double-headed drum of southern India. For the clay double-headed drum of eastern India, see Khol. Mridangam/ Tannumai

Percussion instrument first mentioned as a tannumai in the 1991 Narrinai of the Ettuthokai of the 18 major anthology series of classical tamil literature.

The Mridangam is a percussion instrument from India of ancient origin. It is the primary rhythmic accompaniment in a Carnatic Music ensemble, and in Dhrupad , where it is known as Pakhwaj.
During a percussion ensemble, the mridangam is often accompanied by the ghatam, kanjira and morsing.

In Tamil culture, it is called a tannumai.The earliest mention of the mridangam in Tamil literature is found perhaps in the Sangam literature where the instrument is known as ‘tannumai’. The word “Mridangam” is union of the two Sanskrit words mŗt (clay or earth) and anga (body), as early Mridangam were made of hardened clay. it was one of the principal percussion instruments to sound the beginning of war along with murasu , tudi, and parai because it was believed that its holy sound will deflect enemy arrows and protect the King. During the post-Sangam period, it formed a part of a musical ensemble at the beginning of dramatic performances that would later develop into Bharathnatyam dance style.

In ancient Hindu sculpture, painting, and mythology, the mridangam is often depicted as the instrument of choice for a number of deities including Ganesha (the remover of obstacles) and Nandi, who is the vehicle and follower of Shiva. Nandi is said to have played the mridangam during Shiva’s primordial tandava dance, causing a divine rhythm to resound across the heavens. The mridangam is thus also known as “Deva Vaadyam,” or “Divine Instrument”.

Over the years, the mridangam evolved to be made of different kinds of wood due to its increased durability, and today, its body is constructed from wood of the jackfruit tree. It is widely believed that the tabla, the mridangam’s Hindustani musical counterpart, was first constructed by splitting a mridangam in half. With the development of the mridangam came the tala (rhythm) system.

Mridangam has a large role in Newa Music. One of the earliest Nepal Bhasa manuscripts on music is a treatise on this instrument called Mridanga anukaranam. The importance of a beating has changed over the years. In the old days, percussionists only used to accompany the lead player like the vocalist but this time their development is not restricted to accompaniment only but also to play one instrument shows.

The mridangam is a double-sided drum whose body is usually made using a hollowed piece of jackfruit wood about an inch thick. The two mouths or apertures of the drum are covered with a goatskin and laced to each other with leather straps around the circumference of the drum. These straps are put into a state of high tension to stretch out the circular membranes on either side of the hull, allowing them to resonate when struck. These two membranes are dissimilar in width to allow for the production of both bass and treble sounds from the same drum.

The bass aperture is known as the thoppi or eda bhaaga and the smaller aperture is known as the valanthalai or bala bhaaga. The smaller membrane, when struck, produces higher pitched sounds with a metallic timbre. The wider aperture produces lower pitched sounds. The goat skin covering the smaller aperture is anointed in the center with a black disk made of rice flour, ferric oxide powder and starch. This black tuning paste is known as the satham or karanai and gives the mridangam its distinct metallic timbre.

The combination of two inhomogeneous circular membranes allows for the production of unique and distinct harmonics. Pioneering work on the mathematics of these harmonics was done by Nobel Prize–winning physicist C.V. Raman.

Immediately prior to use in a performance, the leather covering the wider aperture is made moist and a spot of paste made from semolina (rawa) and water is applied to the center, which lowers the pitch of the left membrane and gives it a very powerful resonating bass sound. Nowadays, rubber gum is also used to loosen the membrane helping in creating the bass sound, and its advantage is that unlike semolina, it will not stick on hands. The artist tunes the instrument by varying the tension in the leather straps spanning the hull of the instrument. This is achieved by placing the mridangam upright with its larger side facing down, and then striking the tension-bearing straps located along of circumference of the right membrane with a heavy object (such as a stone). A wooden peg is sometimes placed between the stone and the mridangam during the tuning procedure to ensure that the force is exerted at precisely the point where it is needed. Striking the periphery of the right membrane in the direction toward the hull raises the pitch, while striking the periphery from the opposite side (away from the hull) lowers the pitch. The pitch must be uniform and balanced at all points along the circumference of the valanthalai for the sound to resonate perfectly. The pitch can be balanced with the aid of a pitch pipe or tambura. The larger membrane can also be tuned in a similar manner, though it is not done as frequently. Note that since the leather straps are interwoven between both the smaller and larger aperture, adjusting the tension on one side often can affect the tension on the other.

Article copied from Wikipedia, if you want to know more check out the article there, there is LOT MORE to read!